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VirtualMarshalling IS the future of Distributed I/O

While hosted our seminar in Chicago this week, I was reminded about distributed I/O alternatives out there in the industry and it warranted a bit of discussion. For those that don’t have copies of our latest Fieldbus Report (Spring 2013), you may have missed an article Larry O’Brien at the Fieldbus Foundation has recently put together a document on the future of distributed I/O. The interested thought-provoking premise behind it is that the future of distributed I/O has actually been around for quite some time with FOUNDATION fieldbus.

Why are there others who try to make physical distributed I/O smarter or better when it can be easily eliminated entirely? With FOUNDATION Fieldbus, individual physical I/O points have long been replaced by software based distributed I/O, meaning multiple signals are carried over one single H1 cable. There are no custom hardware configurations or additional hardware components to purchase. It all comes pre-canned with FOUNDATION fieldbus. Blocks can be linked together virtually in the software without the added work, cost and labor of running additional wiring. This is what we’ve dubbed “VirtualMarshalling”. It is the future that is already available today. It’s a bit like those Samsung Galaxy commercials of today that take pokes at the iPhone with their tagline “The Next Big Thing is Already Here”. In the realm of industrial process control, the next big thing is already here and it is called VirtualMarshalling. 
Check out our paper on VirtualMarshalling below and learn how returning to the basics actually provides you with the competitive edge, all built-in. Remember, FOUNDATION fieldbus was built by end users wanting a better technology built specifically for Process Control that can replace the outdated 4-20 from days yore. 
Back to Basics with VirtualMarshalling

An End User Comparison of FOUNDATION Fieldbus and HART

There is no question that FOUNDATION Fieldbus coexists in a world of multiple communication options.  Most plants have a mixture of networks and technologies, and the end user must evaluate available technologies and how they match to their functional specifications.  The following white paper is an even handed discussion of the differences between FOUNDATION technology and HART that people might find useful. 

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